12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Wednesday 7th April 2021
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colin.hill
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12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Post by colin.hill » Fri Mar 05, 2021 4:57 pm

Presentation Title:
Reading for Wellbeing - A Whole School Approach
Details:
A considered approach to embedding a reading for wellbeing scheme within the school community, stemming from the school library. Reflections on how this has been successfully achieved and the impact this has on individual students and their pastoral growth, and how other schools can do the same.

Lauren.Chatley
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Re: 12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Post by Lauren.Chatley » Sun Apr 04, 2021 11:05 pm

Hi everyone, my name is Lauren and I am currently the library manager for an upper school. I have worked in school libraries for close to 8 years now, across primary and secondary ages. Wellbeing has always been a strong focus in the work that I do - I am a strong believer in the pastoral benefits of the school library for students, and the way this contributes to whole school development. My talk centres on how Reading for Wellbeing can be implemented in schools, as well as the advantages of having such an area; none of this would have been achieved without the inspiration of other organisations and individuals I have found over the years. If you are new to the idea of Reading for Wellbeing, or looking to develop your knowledge, I would suggest the following as good sources:

https://reading-well.org.uk/ - The Reading Agency's Reading Well programme, available in public libraries, is a great starting point for considering what titles may feature in any school collection.

https://www.booktrust.org.uk/booklists/ ... awareness/ - The Booktrust is also a staple go to, in particular their mental health awareness booklist.

https://vimeo.com/342991838 - An OpenAccess Webinar from CILIP, where Dr Liz Brewster discusses Bibliotherapy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=embSH_rz8Qs - A fantastic talk by school librarian Emma Wallace, who touches on bibliotherapy but also has some incredible ideas of activities that could be used across the school and not limited to the library.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gl14qIk5EM4 - Sarah Mears here talks about how we can use books to develop empathy.

https://www.nicolamorgan.com/ - A firm favourite of mine, Nicola Morgan writes to both inform young people and aid understanding from others. Her books are well researched and written in easy-to-understand language. Her teaching resources are also a great way of linking her books with SOW that could be used within the curriculum.

I will be about during my talk on Wednesday for any questions; it would also be fantastic to use the forum and share what you're doing in your schools!

Lauren.Chatley
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Re: 12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Post by Lauren.Chatley » Tue Apr 06, 2021 10:47 am

Another couple of things for you all -

Complete Issues - If you don't have a subscription to this already as a school, it is well worth considering. CL have recently started including 'Focus Guides & Spotlights', where they have gathered together different articles on the same subject and put them into a downloadable booklet.

Reading for Wellbeing
- area examples. These are two images of areas created, one pre-pandemic and one during. I feel it is important not to just have books that students can borrow, but also magazines that they can flick through at leisure. The bigger area was situated next to a sofa with a coffee table where students could complete a jigsaw puzzle - in my experience having another legitimate reason for students to be in that specific area made them feel less self-conscious.

Image

Image

Magazines to consider subscribing to:
Positive News - https://www.positive.news/
Teen Breathe - https://www.teenbreathe.co.uk/
The Happy Newspaper - https://thehappynewspaper.com/

Lauren.Chatley
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Re: 12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Post by Lauren.Chatley » Wed Apr 07, 2021 11:54 am

A problem with the images in the above posts - links to Twitter posts with images of Reading for Wellbeing areas are here:

https://twitter.com/MissChatley/status/ ... 65/photo/1

https://twitter.com/MissChatley/status/ ... 12/photo/1

chloealiceb
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Re: 12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Post by chloealiceb » Wed Apr 07, 2021 11:54 pm

Hi Lauren,

Thoroughly enjoyed your presentation. Mental wellbeing and literature are two of my biggest passions as a teacher (and on a personal level) so it is fantastic to be able to see how they can be combined to produce such a positive outcome.

I was wondering if you had any ideas as to how reading for wellbeing could be introduced within a primary school setting? Or how we could work towards something similar on either a classroom and/or school level?

Thanks, Chloe
Miss B
she/her
Y1 Teacher - Sheffield

Lauren.Chatley
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Re: 12.04pm Lauren Chatley

Post by Lauren.Chatley » Thu Apr 08, 2021 11:02 am

Hi Chloe, I'm so glad you enjoyed listening!

There are a few things I'd recommend when working with primary:

Look at building empathy - this can play a crucial part in children beginning/ developing understanding of their own emotional response to scenarios. Empathy sessions in the library could work on the basis of taking a group and reading a specific title (for recommendations I'd always head to https://www.empathylab.uk/2021-read-for ... ollections) then using the rest of the time in the library whilst children search for books to follow up with 1-2-1 conversations if there are any reactions to the story that you are concerned about, or just want to follow up in case this has presented a trigger for a child and they're not sure how to process this. As a library manager I've also been happy to involve myself in these conversations so that the teacher & t.a. had more support - so if you have a librarian make friends with them!

On the subject of empathy, I posted a link to a video from Sarah Mears in this forum where she talks about ways in which you can consolidate what is covered in the books by applying it to the real world - I'd recommend taking a look at this.

Empathy Lab also offer a couple of school programmes that might be worth looking at - they do cost but if you're looking at a whole school approach this may help with everyone being consistent.

Consider Midweek Mindfulness/ Wellbeing Wednesdays - in the library at lunchtime I put out mindfulness colouring, jigsaw puzzles, play calming music and also put some of the RFW books out on tables. Students got to know that this time is supposed to be quieter and more reflective, and led to having more conversations with students who were worried about things, but I did also have a couple of students (in secondary) who were shattered from exams and took the chance to have a nap on the library sofa! Wellbeing Wednesdays could stretch beyond the library though, and become a focus for the whole school with particular activities in tutor time, assemblies, playground activities etc.

You could also have 'Wellbeing Wizards' or 'Empathy Experts' made up of a team of your older primary pupils, or a mix across the school, that can inform the school what they feel is needed to support them in and out of the classroom. One key element of wellbeing to me is feeling that your voice is being heard. You may have sports leaders or arts leaders etc, so if you are able to get your school to recognise wellbeing in the same way, this can have a big impact. Your student leaders could also form a book group where specific wellbeing titles are read and discussed. This can help to find out what topics students feel are important and could inform a wider school focus.

I haven't mentioned reading a lot in this post, but this is on purpose. For me, the collection is there to support and reinforce other things that happen across the school. I focus on trying to put the books into the hands of the students that need them at the time, whether that's directly, or by linking with the school support worker. When I worked in a primary setting I build up a good relationship with the support department, who would then come to me asking about which books I would recommend for: a child losing a grandparent/ parents divorcing/ falling out with friends etc. They would then either spend time with the child and read with them, or give the book to the parents to read with their children. It can work the other way too, in that they recommended books that would be good to buy for the library.

I hope this helps! If there is anything you want to follow up on, please feel free to drop me a line :)

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